Understanding the Shaman’s Tribulations

Understanding the Shaman’s Tribulations – By Taba Menia – The scholarship of shamanism is closely related to ideas about traditional healing and their knowledge. Found across the world in concern with the relationship between health and the super-natural, Shamans are observed as custodians of the human realm. Becoming a shaman involves expertise in traditional knowledge … Continue reading Understanding the Shaman’s Tribulations

(Almost) Native Ethnography Meets the Heat of the Tunisian Desert

– by Imen El Amouri – Before embarking on my ethnographic graduate research, I dove into literature on native anthropological research in North Africa and the Arab world. My personal anguish over social and political conditions in my parents' (and sometimes my own) home country motivated me to study Tunisian society. With confidence, I started … Continue reading (Almost) Native Ethnography Meets the Heat of the Tunisian Desert

Ghosts Look Over the Shoulders of Myanmar Peace Negotiators

Peace Studies researcher Elise Boulding wrote that peace, including the type sought today in Myanmar, is focused by a “two hundred year present.”  By this she meant that how people think about their values, fears, loyalties and dreams is inherited from the memories of parents and grandparents who recall the emotional events they heard about … Continue reading Ghosts Look Over the Shoulders of Myanmar Peace Negotiators

One (dis)placed ethnographer’s movements during the pandemic: Is the on-line world a lesser ethnographic world?

– guest blog By Sarah Huxley – The joys and pains of ethnography, as many an ethnographer might tell you, focus on the immersive, and experiential conundrums that ‘real life’ invariably spits up. That’s not to say that there is no/ little preparation, but rather to say that the very nature of the ethnographic methodology, … Continue reading One (dis)placed ethnographer’s movements during the pandemic: Is the on-line world a lesser ethnographic world?

The Fear of Dahalo Bandits on a Drive Through the Alaotra Night (Madagascar)

– guest blog by Anders Norge Lauridsen – Why are we stopping? The shadows are growing longer and the twilight is near, but we still have a long way home to the village of Anororo ahead of us. A man at a run from the other tractor several ridges behind us catches up with our … Continue reading The Fear of Dahalo Bandits on a Drive Through the Alaotra Night (Madagascar)

Returning

– guest blog by Valerie Miller – Returning is a problematic word for anthropologists. To turn is to go around, go another direction, move to a different position. But REturning would then mean to stay right where you are (by turning again), realizing the full circle. It is movement from A to B to A, … Continue reading Returning

What does a Chicken, Drums, Whiskey, Gossip, and International Diplomacy have in common?

With the Ethnography.com website's updated 'modern' look and my 'mysterious' long-term disappearance from America, you may be wondering about the site's header photos, and what the heck is going on over here?  Maybe call this 'flash ethnography' mixed with ethnographic photography. Here are five short stories... ^ THIS IS THE CHURCH COURTYARD at the ethnographer's … Continue reading What does a Chicken, Drums, Whiskey, Gossip, and International Diplomacy have in common?

Reading Myanmar—‘Miss Burma’ and the Liberal Conscience

Miss Burma (2017) by Charmaine Craig is a historical novel that tells the story of Burma from the perspective of a Karen family that was part of Rangoon’s elite after World War II. The book describes the Karen perspective on mid-20th-century wars in Burma, beginning with the Japanese invasion in 1942 and continuing today.  Resonating particularly … Continue reading Reading Myanmar—‘Miss Burma’ and the Liberal Conscience

Batman’s Butler Alfred Philosophizes about Colonial Violence in British Burma

Colonial Burma has a strange hold on the Anglo-American imagination—it is a remote and exotic place where the British were not very successful in holding sway. British authority was routinely challenged by people in the forests of Burma who, the British felt, did not understand the beneficent “reason” inherent to their colonial project. From a British … Continue reading Batman’s Butler Alfred Philosophizes about Colonial Violence in British Burma

The Elephants, the Peace Process, and the Blindmen in a Myanmar Hotel Ballroom

 The Joint Peace Fund, the group sponsoring the 2015 Ceasefire in Myanmar, sponsored a reception on International Peace Day at the Chatrium Hotel in September 2019.  I was there because like much of Yangon’s NGO world, I know that the Joint Peace Fund administers a huge pot of foreign aid that funds the “peace process”. … Continue reading The Elephants, the Peace Process, and the Blindmen in a Myanmar Hotel Ballroom

Insistence on Voluntary Rohingya Repatriation to Myanmar Lacks ‘Moral Imagination’

Published August 29, 2019 in The Irrawaddy of Yangon, Myanmar. By TONY WATERS  The International Donors are meeting frequently to discuss the 1 million Rohingya refugees sitting in the refugee camps of Cox’s Bazaar.  The strange assertion that “the refugees will  go home to Rakhine soon voluntarily because we have a plan” is again being recycled; … Continue reading Insistence on Voluntary Rohingya Repatriation to Myanmar Lacks ‘Moral Imagination’

What is Ethnography? Ethnografia ni nini?

What is Ethnography? Often, people do not understand my work as an ‘ethnographer.’ Perhaps, they assume I am creating a life of luxury for myself and just sitting somewhere. Or, they will ask me, are you a writer for the news? Then I reply, no, I am not that kind of writer. Often, those kinds … Continue reading What is Ethnography? Ethnografia ni nini?