Why Stephen Colbert’s Job is Safe: Dirimens Copulatio

Not only am I not arguing what you say I am, I’m arguing some of the things you say I’m not. Your title, “circling the wagons,” implies the exact opposite of what I was suggesting. This metaphor suggests insularity and defensiveness, at best. In fact, my essay could easily be interpreted as a call to … Continue reading Why Stephen Colbert’s Job is Safe: Dirimens Copulatio

send anthropology’s wayward street walking child home!

Tony Waters of CSU Chico has kindly posted a response to "Circling the Wagons is not the solution." Thanks for adding to the conversation Tony! Mark, Mark, Mark! I think you miss Cindy’s point which is that culture [editor note: Cindy thinks this is a typo and Tony means Anthropology has a special role and … Continue reading send anthropology’s wayward street walking child home!

A small story about micro-loans.

About 10 months ago I joined www.kiva.org for my first experiment with a micro-loan. If you have not encountered this yet, micro-loans are a growing industry in developing nations all over the world. The idea is quite simple, these are very small loans many less than a few hundred dollars to help someone start or … Continue reading A small story about micro-loans.

Circling the Wagons is not the solution to anthropology’s problems

Cindy, Cindy, Cindy! The problem with academic anthropology today (and I can only speak to cultural anthropology) is that the concept of culture is the most static and smothered at the hands of anthropologists! The problem is not that all these other disciplines are misusing culture, but that most academics in anthropology can’t accept that … Continue reading Circling the Wagons is not the solution to anthropology’s problems

Can (and Should) Anthropology Share Culture?

For me, the short answer to this question is obviously, yes. We want EVERYONE to know and love the concept that we consider to be our finest intellectual creation, the lynchpin of our diverse discipline. And yet, could it be the case that we have shared ourselves out of jobs, or worse yet, allowed our … Continue reading Can (and Should) Anthropology Share Culture?

Foxfire, Forward into the past (again)

Growing up, my father felt it was important for my brother and me to know about our roots as dirt farmers and coal miners. My mother and father were raised in the coal mining regions on the tri-state border of Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia. It was a cultural conflict for them. On the one … Continue reading Foxfire, Forward into the past (again)

Kennewick Man Sighted Buying Groceries in Virginia

Most everyone in the anthropological community is familiar with the controversial human skeletal find known as Kennewick Man. Discovered in 1996 by some hikers on the Columbia River, Washington, Kennewick Man was initially identified as a 19th century Euro-American settler, but closer inspection revealed a projectile point embedded in his pelvis that was common about … Continue reading Kennewick Man Sighted Buying Groceries in Virginia

Welcome new Blogger, Cynthia Van Gilder

Ethnography.com Welcomes a new anthropology blogger, Cynthia Van Gilder to the ranks. Cindy is the chair of the anthropology department at St. Mary's College in Moraga, California. Check out her first post, "Kennewick Man Sighted Buying Groceries in Virginia." Welcome!