Would a President Obama Bring an Anthropological Perspective to the White House?

I was impressed with Barack Obama’s statement on race in America.  It showed an awareness of empathy, race, and culture that I am more accustomed to hearing about in university seminars in say, anthropology, than political addresses in the middle of a campaign.  I hope that Obama is correct in assuming that the American people are ready for such an approach.

Obama himself of course has had unusual exposure to anthropological thinking.  His mother Ann Dunham Soetoro was an anthropology student at the University of Hawaii, and eventually earned a Ph.D. after spending four years doing field work in Indonesia for her dissertation “Peasant blacksmithing in Indonesia: Surviving and Thriving Against All Odds” which was 1067 pages long (sounds like overkill to me!).  She also had a career as an applied anthropologist, working for USAID, and the Ford Foundation.

Besides living in Indonesia from ages 6-10, Obama himself also reportedly visited his mother many times while she continued to live in Indonesia.  While he was not an anthropology major himself, I have some hope that if he becomes president, a more nuanced view of cultural issues will be moving into the White House.

3 thoughts on “Would a President Obama Bring an Anthropological Perspective to the White House?

  1. Tony

    Well, two and a half years after writing this post…Hmm. Obama pulled the troops out of Iraq, Guantanamo Bay is still open, and he doubled down on troop commitments in Iraq. The State Department is taking over the “war” effort in Iraq, not the AAA. Drones are in greater use than ever over Pakistan, Afghanistan, and presumably elsewhere. Somehow, I think that the Pentagon is being channelled more than the AAA.

  2. Tony

    Yup, no new news. It is now three years since I speculated what a President Obama might do differently because of an inherited anthropological imagination. I guess that we now have evidence that such things are not inherited by any kind of gene. Once again, a heritability hypothesis, albeit a whimsical one, bites the dust!

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