Singing in Sociology Class

Occasionally I break into song, particularly when teaching my Classical Sociology class. Classical sociologists Max Weber, and W. E. B. DuBois wrote about the importance of music in defining group boundaries. In the case of Max Weber, he noted that dominant groups typically have myths and stories which glorify a past of some sort. A great way to illustrate the importance of these songs is to break into song in a fashion that illustrates the the stories that separate the dominant from the subordinate. Thus, the South in the US Civil War marched to the tune of “Dixie” a song which glorified old times of cotton plantations, and southern industry of the early 19th century.

But, as Weber also wrote, subordinated groups also have ways of expressing their views about the hidden honor of their own group. The South was built on the backs of millions of subordinated African-American slaves, who dreamt of future redemption, a desire that they too expressed in music. In the case of the slaves, these are what W. E. B. DuBois called the “Sorrow Songs” because they expressed both joy and sorrow at the same time. Today, such songs are better known today as spirituals. Two such well-known songs are about crossing over the River Jordan, and passing into the Promised Land are “Swing Low Sweet Chariot and “Michael Row the Boat Ashore.” Julia Ward Howe’s song “Battle Hymn of the Republic,” to which the northern armies marched in the Civil War is also a song of expressing a desire for future redemption. The Civil Rights anthem “We Shall Overcome,” is another obvious song of this genre.

For years, I have been able to go to class and sing (badly) a few bars of any of these songs. And suddenly half the class would be filling in the rest of the lyrics. More recently, this has become more difficult. Last semester while teaching about W. E. B. DuBois, I began singing “Michael Row the Boat Ashore,” a song that I sang as a child both in school, and in camp. Few of my 1980s born students had heard of it. Earlier in the semester, I had tried “Swing Low Sweet Chariot,” with only slightly better results. Why would my students not share such classic songs?

Answers to interesting questions often come in unusual places. On New Year’s Eve, I went to the home of an elementary music teacher. She complained about the declining role of music, or what she called “cultural literacy” in the public schools. She pointed out that in recent years music, art, drama and other subjects have given way to new emphases on basic literacy, and math, to the exclusion of all else. But, she said the creeping cultural illiteracy actually goes back earlier than this. To understand how music has been slowly disappearing from the schools, she explained, you need to go back further, to the 1960s when cultural and policy changes began to effect what is taught in the school.

For example, she pointed out that basic piano skills were until thirty or forty years ago part of teacher education, at least for primary school teachers. Music was a daily occurrence in each of my primary school classrooms (many of which had a piano), and my teachers who were presumably trained under the older policies, continued teaching until at least the 1980s or so. With the demise of the piano requirement for all teachers, my students were slowly pushed for their musical education towards Barney the Purple Dinosaur, Sesame Street and, since they were children of the 1990s, Britney Spears and the Backstreet Boys. For whatever reason, the creators of these new cultural resources did not include the songs that emerged from the Civil War and were so important in my own elementary school career in the 1960s and early 1970s.

Which of course raises another question for me as I prepare for a new semester. What songs can I sing in class to illustrate great sociological points about the nature of sorrow and joy in subordinated groups, or the glorification of the past by dominant groups? If “Dixie” and “Swing Low Sweet Chariot” won’t work, what would? What is the common musical heritage that a child of the 1960s can share with children of the 1990s?

I will again teach Max Weber on the nature of subordination, and Martin Luther King’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” in a couple of weeks, and would appreciate any ideas you may have. If anyone reading this has any ideas, please let me know.

And no, I will not sing “Oops I Did it Again” by Britney Spears!

9 thoughts on “Singing in Sociology Class

  1. Cindy

    My sociology colleague (approx. 65 years old) likes this Gavin DeGraw song because she thinks it speaks to being from a blue collar background.

    Artist: Gavin DeGraw
    Album: Chariot
    Year: 2003
    Title: I Don’t Want To Be

    Lyrics to I Don’t Want To Be:

    I don’t need to be anything other
    Than a prison guard’s son
    I don’t need to be anything other
    Than a specialist’s son
    I don’t have to be anyone other
    Than the birth of two souls in one
    Part of where I’m going, is knowing where I’m coming from
    I don’t want to be
    Anything other than what I’ve been trying to be lately
    All I have to do
    Is think of me and I have peace of mind
    I’m tired of looking ’round rooms
    Wondering what I’ve got to do
    Or who I’m supposed to be
    I don’t want to be anything other than me
    I’m surrounded by liars everywhere I turn
    I’m surrounded by imposters everywhere I turn
    I’m surrounded by identity crisis everywhere I turn
    Am I the only one who noticed?
    I can’t be the only one who’s learned!
    I don’t want to be
    Anything other than what I’ve been trying to be lately
    All I have to do
    Is think of me and I have peace of mind
    I’m tired of looking ’round rooms
    Wondering what I’ve got to do
    Or who I’m supposed to be
    I don’t want to be anything other than me
    Can I have everyone’s attention please?
    If you’re not like this and that, you’re gonna have to leave
    I came from the mountain
    The crust of creation
    My whole situation-made from clay to stone
    And now I’m telling everybody
    I don’t want to be
    Anything other than what I’ve been trying to be lately
    All I have to do
    Is think of me and I have peace of mind
    I’m tired of looking ’round rooms
    Wondering what I’ve got to do
    Or who I’m supposed to be
    I don’t want to be anything other than me
    I don’t want to be
    [ I Don’t Want To Be Lyrics on http://www.lyricsmania.com/ ]

  2. Tony

    I had a look at the “You Tube” version of “This Land is Your Land” which was done by Pete Seeger and Bruce Springsteen at the Obama inaugural yesterday. This prompted lots of warm memories about Pete Seeger and his rendition of the old west African “Abi-yoyo” story which many baby boomers may remember from the 1960s. I asked Kirsten my 17 year-old daughter what her memories of this were. Her comments were
    a) She has never heard of Pete Seeger
    b) She has never heard of Abi-yoyo
    c) But it turns out she knows quite a few Pete Seeger folk songs, which is about as good as it gets, I guess.

    For those of you have never heard of Abiyoyo, here is the You Tube link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OHR9uJLS3XA

  3. Djudje

    Why not ask the students to do the research? Provide them with the basic fundamental concepts of how these issues are expressed through music, ask them to identify the cultural, political, or ideological issues permeating their world, and then ask them to find and analyze music.

  4. Hugo J. Beerli

    Why not try Hava Nagila to celebrate the beginning of the semester and sociology.

  5. Tony

    Do you really think my students might know that one? We should check with our daughters before I try…

  6. Hugo J. Beerli

    There is a good chance that students will recognize the melody but not recognize the lyrics. All three daughters of mine recognized it and I have known it for decades.

  7. Bakari McClendon

    “The Message” by Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five, I think, would be one this generation might know because it speaks to the emergence of the “hip-hop” culture (Turntablism, grafitti art, break dancing, and emceeing) in urban centers. The subordinate group would be the urban poor. I suggest this only because it is a cult song that represents the angst of city life and growing up in the ghetto, and before commercialism destroyed hip-hop’s conscience.

    Just try saying, with a (4/4 rhythm),

    “Don’t push me
    ‘cuz I’m close
    to the edge…”

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