Undergrad Seminar: How long should this paper be?

Every student wants to know "How long should this paper be?" I think that's a pretty reasonable question, but for some reason instructors sometimes treat this question like one of the deadly sins. Ironically, when your instructor is asked to present a paper, they are given the answer to that very question at the beginning!  … Continue reading Undergrad Seminar: How long should this paper be?

Undergrad Seminar: Why Incompletes Are So Dangerous

Here we are in the 2nd half of the academic year. If the 1st half got off to a rocky start, maybe this is a good time to talk about time management. Not the "The 7 habits of that smugly overambitious go-getter" variety. This is aimed more at the "How can I squeeze school into … Continue reading Undergrad Seminar: Why Incompletes Are So Dangerous

Ethnography, Tanzania, PhD degrees, and Something to Read at Bedtime

         Someone told me once that a PhD is a license to write for other PhDs.  As Donna Lanclos notes, this is different than making a living, and getting a full-time tenure-track job.  Nevertheless, as Donna herself demonstrated with her own book about childhood in Northern Ireland, this is a license that we can … Continue reading Ethnography, Tanzania, PhD degrees, and Something to Read at Bedtime

PhD, or not PhD

A column in The Chronicle of Higher Education, as pointed to by my friend Matt Bandy, has an interesting take on the essentialness (or lack thereof) of a Ph.D.  The column is specific to the humanities, but is easily transferable to the social sciences, and I think most particularly, to Anthropology.  Matt makes his points … Continue reading PhD, or not PhD

I Hope That The Human Terrain Teams Read The Deceivers by John Masters: An Anthropological Novel

One of my favorite all-time historical novels is The Deceivers by John Masters. Published in 1952, the protagonist William Savage is an administrator in a remote district for the British East Indian Company. The book is set in 1825. Savage speaks four Indian languages, and has spent 19 years in the colonial service. As a … Continue reading I Hope That The Human Terrain Teams Read The Deceivers by John Masters: An Anthropological Novel

Mark said we’re not blogging about HTS anymore

but I thought this was a good story, not specifically about HTS, but about one anthropologist's work with the military, as a professor at the Marine Corps University at Quantico. Not surprisingly, I agree with the points she makes about grey areas, and about how each anthropologist needs to "draw their own line."

Blogging is soooooooooo 2006

This is the time of year when blogs talk about their top posts for the 2009, the most important issues in their area of interest and otherwise reflecting with great insight on the past year or decade. I promise this blog will continue its long held tradition to avoid insights at all costs.  So forward, … Continue reading Blogging is soooooooooo 2006