Why Does Anthropology Worry about Jared Diamond when they have Nigel Barley?

The Anthropology blogosphere (including Ethnography.com, SavageMinds.org, anthropologyreport.com and even National Public Radio) has recently lit up with critiques of Jared Diamond’s new book The World Until Yesterday.  Jared Diamonditis seems to be a regular affliction of anthropology, re-emerging every time that the esteemed Professor of Geography (and Physiology) publishes a new tome of big picture history.  … Continue reading Why Does Anthropology Worry about Jared Diamond when they have Nigel Barley?

This Week in Ethnography: Does Jared Diamond do Ethnography?

This week in Ethnography, I realized that "DIY anthropologist" Jared Diamond is now moving into the area of anthropology I hold most dear - ethnography.  In earlier publications and movies, Diamond has dabbled in other areas of anthropology (e.g., archeology and physical) but his latest work cuts too close for my comfort.  Barbara J. King posted a review of Diamond's … Continue reading This Week in Ethnography: Does Jared Diamond do Ethnography?

Why The DIYBio Lab Is The New Darkroom

This is the second in a series of posts about my work on DIYBio. The initial post has some background and can be found here. A popular (and sexy) comparison for DIYBio is with the Homebrew Computer Club. One often reads that DIYBio is at the same point in its development as the HCC was just … Continue reading Why The DIYBio Lab Is The New Darkroom

Writing Against Identity Politics: An Essay on Gender, Race, and Bureaucratic Pain,” in the latest issue of American Ethnologist

Smadar Lavie’s essay, “Writing Against Identity Politics: An Essay on Gender, Race, and Bureaucratic Pain,” appears in the latest issue of American Ethnologist (Volume 39, Issue 4). The essay focuses on Israel’s single mothers on welfare who are Mizrahi—Jews with origins in the Muslim World. Here is its abstract:

Equating bureaucratic entanglements with pain—or what, arguably, … Continue reading Writing Against Identity Politics: An Essay on Gender, Race, and Bureaucratic Pain,” in the latest issue of American Ethnologist

This Week in Ethnography: Blog, “LivingEthnography”

This Week in Ethnography I found an interesting blog entitled, LIVING ETHNOGRAPHY: Research and Conversations on Ethnography, Writing and Folklore As personal blogs go, it's more productive than most and the content is appealing.  The About page is interesting in that it provides a few hints at the authors identity but no name: I am a … Continue reading This Week in Ethnography: Blog, “LivingEthnography”

THIS WEEK IN ETHNOGRAPHY: Teaching Anthropology ‘Way Off Campus

This week in Ethnography, Heather E. Young-Leslie, Ph.D. describes how best to teach ethnography in the post entitled Sand in My Syllabus; Teaching Anthropology ‘Way Off Campus. The anthropologist professor is not replaceable, not redundant. But the style of teaching anthropology that we have had since WWII… well, that is replaceable. I start with the above quotation from the conclusion to … Continue reading THIS WEEK IN ETHNOGRAPHY: Teaching Anthropology ‘Way Off Campus