On Time and Evaluation

by Scott Freeman I was recently at a bar and jokingly attacked by a couple of friends about non-quantitative data. Consultants love them some numbers. While their jests were well taken, the underlying point was also well taken. As Hervè Varenne addressed in his position paper on anthropology and education, students of anthropology often find … Continue reading On Time and Evaluation

Lawrence Cremin and Mara Mayor Discuss Technology and Education In 1989

Given the discussion of MOOCs that has been occurring in the blogosphere over the last year, I thought it might be helpful to get a longer perspective on technology and education. In that spirit, I have dug up this 30 minute conversation between Lawrence Cremin of Teachers College and Mara Mayor of the Annenberg CPB … Continue reading Lawrence Cremin and Mara Mayor Discuss Technology and Education In 1989

More on Scientific Reductionism–this time from a conservative columnist

David Brooks, the center-right columnist at the New York Times today published a column about the limitations on neuron research.  He’s not against neural research, just the hubris that tends to collect around it.  Like research on DNA, research on neurons is great stuff—but no matter how enthusiastic the scientists may be, it does not … Continue reading More on Scientific Reductionism–this time from a conservative columnist

Good News for the State of Nevada!

I will be in Thailand this summer for five weeks teaching a course for the University of Nevada, Reno, as a Visiting Professor.  As part of the employment procedure, I had to sign a loyalty oath indicating “I will support, protect and defend the Constitution and Government of the United States, and the Constitution and … Continue reading Good News for the State of Nevada!

Discovering Exaptation: Or, How To Leverage Your Philosophical Baggage To Further Science

I want take up Tony’s question about this Dennett quote: There is no such thing as philosophy-free science; there is only science whose philosophical baggage is taken on board without examination (Dennett 1995) One way to answer this is through recourse to the literature on Science and Technology Studies (STS). We could weave our way … Continue reading Discovering Exaptation: Or, How To Leverage Your Philosophical Baggage To Further Science

Why is it so Hard for a Ivy League Grad to Talk to His Plumber?

I just came across this article about elite education, and the habits of the Ivy Leaguers.  I really like the opening paragraphs which asks why the author, who is an Ivy League grad has so much trouble talking to the plumber who will fix his pipes. This has a lot to do with what Pierre … Continue reading Why is it so Hard for a Ivy League Grad to Talk to His Plumber?

Philosophy and Reading Widely

There are two blogs I have read recently which make the good point that reading “classics” is important . At the New York Times, Philosopher Gary Gutting makes the point that a college education is not so much about “the content,” (or presumably the major) but about the habits of reading and inquiry developed. Or … Continue reading Philosophy and Reading Widely

A Review of Jason Richwine’s Thesis by Someone Who Actually Read It

Anthropology Now has a review out by Elizabeth Chin who actually read Jason Richwine’s PhD Thesis on genetics and i.q. from Harvard’s Kennedy School.  The review is framed as the feedback Richwine should have received from one of his three committee members, but did not.  Chin raises many of the same issues that Michael Scroggins … Continue reading A Review of Jason Richwine’s Thesis by Someone Who Actually Read It