Lawrence Cremin and Mara Mayor Discuss Technology and Education In 1989

Given the discussion of MOOCs that has been occurring in the blogosphere over the last year, I thought it might be helpful to get a longer perspective on technology and education. In that spirit, I have dug up this 30 minute conversation between Lawrence Cremin of Teachers College and Mara Mayor of the Annenberg CPB … Continue reading Lawrence Cremin and Mara Mayor Discuss Technology and Education In 1989

More on Scientific Reductionism–this time from a conservative columnist

David Brooks, the center-right columnist at the New York Times today published a column about the limitations on neuron research.  He’s not against neural research, just the hubris that tends to collect around it.  Like research on DNA, research on neurons is great stuff—but no matter how enthusiastic the scientists may be, it does not … Continue reading More on Scientific Reductionism–this time from a conservative columnist

Discovering Exaptation: Or, How To Leverage Your Philosophical Baggage To Further Science

I want take up Tony’s question about this Dennett quote: There is no such thing as philosophy-free science; there is only science whose philosophical baggage is taken on board without examination (Dennett 1995) One way to answer this is through recourse to the literature on Science and Technology Studies (STS). We could weave our way … Continue reading Discovering Exaptation: Or, How To Leverage Your Philosophical Baggage To Further Science

A Review of Jason Richwine’s Thesis by Someone Who Actually Read It

Anthropology Now has a review out by Elizabeth Chin who actually read Jason Richwine’s PhD Thesis on genetics and i.q. from Harvard’s Kennedy School.  The review is framed as the feedback Richwine should have received from one of his three committee members, but did not.  Chin raises many of the same issues that Michael Scroggins … Continue reading A Review of Jason Richwine’s Thesis by Someone Who Actually Read It