The Truth About Police

Another unarmed Black man died at the hands of law enforcement on Thursday night. The NYC Police Commissioner was quick in calling the incident an "unfortunate tragedy" at the same time that the mainstream press has included that the officer was a "rookie" in most of their headlines. Akai Gurley, the 28-year old Brooklyn victim … Continue reading The Truth About Police

Searching for Answers: Retracing a Hmong Heritage

Today's post comes from Guest Ethnographer Dee Thao. This is a beautiful and honest film Dee directed and edited about her search for information and connection to her Hmong heritage and identity. Her "advisor extraordinaire" (and co-star) on this project was ethnography.com's Tony Waters. Dee Thao is a documentarian based out of northern California. Click … Continue reading Searching for Answers: Retracing a Hmong Heritage

Privilege In Life, Privilege In Death

By: Tony Waters To provide some broader context about Marc Thompson’s murder...Julie and I talked on the phone last night about two different cases that have been in the newspapers of Butte County, California, recently, where we live.  Two years ago, a young man was tragically lost during the annual Labor Day river float--a fun-filled … Continue reading Privilege In Life, Privilege In Death

Resources, Resources, Resources!

We are updating our links and resources here on ethnography.com. Give this link a click, and check out what's new. I've added some sociology into the mix but we'd love to hear from you, our readers. What kind of resources are you looking for on our website? Please give us your feedback and your links! … Continue reading Resources, Resources, Resources!

If These Halls Could Talk

In spring 2010 director Lee Mun Wah asked me to co-facilitate a documentary he was shooting that summer titled, If These Halls Could Talk. I remember the day well, it was spring break and I was at home, a tired teacher sitting in the sun outside when the phone rang. I was a fan of Mun Wah's … Continue reading If These Halls Could Talk

La Crueldad del Hombre

Is art ethnographic? Art and visual representation cut across the disciplines but is especially suited for sociological and anthropological inquiry. Art tells us a story about our practices and beliefs and we find ourselves in what we and others create. It also reflects us back to ourselves, sometimes we like it but if it's really good, … Continue reading La Crueldad del Hombre

Researching Around the Surveillance State

Last month in the New York Review of Books, historian Natalie Zemon Davis wrote a short essay about her experience with the FBI in late 1952. Upon returning from France, where she was conducting archive research for her PhD thesis, this happened: Not long after my return, two gentlemen from the US State Department arrived … Continue reading Researching Around the Surveillance State

Is Your Class in the Way?

By: N. Jeanne Burns   A few weeks ago at the YWCA Midtown I sat outside the gate to cool down from my run. I scrolled through Twitter posts about the Dunn trial and read about whites fearing blacks. Then I heard the desk clerk say, "You can only use your driver's license three times. … Continue reading Is Your Class in the Way?