Campbell’s Law, Planned Social Change, Vietnam War Deaths, and Condom Distributions in Refugee Camps

Donald T. Campbell was a psychologist in the 1970s. During this time, the belief emerged that society was a social engineering project that could be planned and evaluated.  The general idea was  that if you collected enough data, you could plan and control social change in a way that led to desired results.  Economists from … Continue reading Campbell’s Law, Planned Social Change, Vietnam War Deaths, and Condom Distributions in Refugee Camps

Expressing Outrage and Lynching: Vigilantism in a Tanzanian Village, 1997

(Adapted from Tony Waters, When Killing is a Crime, Lynne Rienner Publishers 2007). By Essau Magugudi in Kigoma NOVEMBER 27, 1997, is deeply etched in the memories of Shunga villagers. It was on this day that they took law into their own hands and hacked to death three bandits who they suspected of carrying out … Continue reading Expressing Outrage and Lynching: Vigilantism in a Tanzanian Village, 1997

Carlos

Late December 2006 This morning, while sitting at one of the tables by the pool visiting with a resident of the complex, I noticed Palm fronds falling from the canopy of green above me. I followed the thwup, thwup, thwup? of a heavy tool beating in the air to the cascade of fronds falling to … Continue reading Carlos

The Rochambo of Paradox, Conundrums, Dilemmas, and School Bureaucracies

The below is pp. 185-186 (Chapter 9) of my book Schooling, Childhood, and Bureaucracy: Bureaucratizing the Child. Other extracts can be read here at Ethnography.com here, (Leaky First Graders, etc.) here, (How the Rich Educate their Children: A Swiss Hogwarts) and here. (Children as Raw Material on the Bureaucratic Assembly Line) Or better yet, you … Continue reading The Rochambo of Paradox, Conundrums, Dilemmas, and School Bureaucracies

Why isn’t ethnography.com more focused on ethnography? Um, ‘cause I don’t feel like it.

I like to use the categories on our homepage to surf through old posts, looking for oldies but goodies to re-post on slow days. I also like to read and think about anthropology and sociology and I can count on finding something here to get my mental juices flowing. And like Mark describes below, I … Continue reading Why isn’t ethnography.com more focused on ethnography? Um, ‘cause I don’t feel like it.

How Class Differences Shape Love and Marriage

I just ordered and am very excited to soon be reading, The Power of the Past: Understanding Cross-Class Marriages by Jessi Streib. Books about marriage are plentiful but an ethnographic account of cross-class marriages is something new. If you click this link, it will direct you to a Washington Post article written by Streib that gives you a … Continue reading How Class Differences Shape Love and Marriage