Lost Ethnographies, and other musings

Here is a link to a book with a real original thought!  The Lost Ethnographies.  Most projects of course never get anywhere.  For example last month I wrote a brief blog about my trip to Yangon, and why I though it seemed like an interesting and engaging city.  I promised a follow-up blog about its putative relationship with the rest of Myanmar, particularly the areas in revolt, and the populations in diaspora. But I have yet to get around to it–so it is still a lost ethnography, I guess.  To whet you appetite, the beginning hook will begin with how my Karen students evaluated non-violent resistance after reading Martin Luther King’s classic essay, “Letter from a Birmingham Jail.”  Because that too is part of my “lost ethnography.”  In the meantime, please enjoy the blog from the London School of Economics, which begins below!

Tony Waters, Chiangmai Thailand, April 1, 2019

Book Review: The Lost Ethnographies: Methodological Insights from Projects that Never Were edited by Robin James Smith and Sara Delamont

The Lost Ethnographies: Methodological Insights from Projects that Never Were. Robin James Smith and Sara Delamont (eds). Emerald Publishing. 2019.

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I was seduced by the subtitle of this book: Methodological Insights from Projects that Never Were. Research methods, and research ethics, are my primary interests. This no doubt helped me to find the book engaging, but I think it was not the only reason. This book is wide-ranging and well-written. Each chapter has a distinct voice and those voices harmonise pleasantly into a whole, which points to diligent work by the editors, Robin James Smith and Sara Delamont.

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