Hey, I’m Back

Hey, hello. I haven’t been here for a while. For the last year, Tony and Bill have been keeping things running here at ethnography.com while Marianne’s piece, “The McDonaldization of Higher Education” continued to be our top post week after week. You probably also caught Chunyan’s series on the Sociology of food and how we might … Continue reading Hey, I’m Back

That Sinking Feeling: Polar Bear Environmental Art

By: Michael Engelhard If art’s mission is to change public perceptions or to transcend established practices, it can no longer be apolitical, unaware of social or economic currents. The creators of an exhibit that examines the “cultural afterlife” of taxidermised polar bears (nanoq: flat out and bluesome, by Bryndís Snæbjörnsdóttir and Mark Wilson) sum up a … Continue reading That Sinking Feeling: Polar Bear Environmental Art

We’ve Always Done It This Way

I wrote the post below during my last semester as an adjunct instructor at a rural community college. I resurrect it here because Warren Waren over at Racism Review just published "Institutional Racism: Comparing Oscar Nominations with Higher Education Faculty." It's a must-read, especially for anti-racist White academics serving on hiring committees, as faculty and … Continue reading We’ve Always Done It This Way

Me & Tony Talk About the Corporatization of Higher Ed on Facebook

I like the "On this day" app on facebook. I don't teach anymore but I'm reminded of things I taught or read and what I thought about them, it's good to reflect now that I'm an official "post-ac" (that's a former academic, mostly adjuncts, who got fed up with the b.s. and left academia for greener pastures). … Continue reading Me & Tony Talk About the Corporatization of Higher Ed on Facebook

True Believers and Personality Tests

I used to be a true believer in the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). I can’t remember when I first encountered the 93 question test but it was probably during grad school. I was at my height of believing in it though, when I was part of a two-year leadership development program at my old job. … Continue reading True Believers and Personality Tests

Cowboy Nation

A few nights ago, my husband and I saw the new sci-fi film, The Martian. We arrived early, grabbed our pairs of 3D glasses and set off to find seats, towards the back and on the aisle. I’d felt somewhat nervous as we sat there, paranoid with thoughts about Thursday’s mass shooting in Oregon and … Continue reading Cowboy Nation

Shared Governance or Managed Dissent at Chico State?

The demand for civility effectively outlaws a range of intellectual, literary, and political forms; satire is not civil, caricature is not civil, hyperbole and aesthetic mockery are not civil nor is polemic. Ultimately, the call for civility is a demand that you not express anger; and if it was enforced it would suggest that there … Continue reading Shared Governance or Managed Dissent at Chico State?

How I Spent My Summer Vacation (and Other Stuff)

It was 53 degrees this morning where I live at the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Fall is in the air, which is nice because with the drought going on it’s been a long, hot, and breezy/dry summer in our woods and it’s still fire season, at least until we get our first good … Continue reading How I Spent My Summer Vacation (and Other Stuff)

The Tattooed Professor Has Some New Year’s Resolutions for Academics

The Tattooed Professor (AKA Kevin Gannon) has some New Year's resolutions for academics and they're so good, we wanted to tell you about it. We like the Tattooed Professor here at e.com, we think he's cool and provocative; I like him because he is direct, something we working class people value. This time, the Tattooed … Continue reading The Tattooed Professor Has Some New Year’s Resolutions for Academics

The High Cost of Mean Bosses

Yesterday's New York Times featured an opinion piece on rudeness and incivility in the workplace and the high cost of mean bosses. It's true, mean bosses suck. I've only had a couple, and most of my bosses during my low wage service years were pleasant overall or mostly absent, which is nice too. When I was a … Continue reading The High Cost of Mean Bosses

Artichokes

By Guest Writer: N. Jeanne Burns A friend said recently that one definitive marker of social class is whether you know how to eat an artichoke. This probably isn't true for migrant farmworkers who toil in or around Castroville, California, the self-proclaimed "Artichoke Capital of the World." Or even for people who grew up on … Continue reading Artichokes

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Stigma, and Learned Helplessness

Does the stigmatized individual assume his differentness is known about already or is evident on the spot, or does he assume it is neither known about by those present nor immediately perceivable by them? In the first case one deals with the plight of the discredited, in the second with that of the discreditable. This is … Continue reading Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Stigma, and Learned Helplessness