Is Drumming Better than Prozac? An Anthropological Reflection

'Mental health' has been shown to be social and environmental, though we've heard of Prozac, and even music therapy led by professionals.  Well-being may also be connected to collective, organized sound among ordinary people.  I'd like to share a recent study in biomedicine, and draw these scientific conclusions into the anthropological realm.  First, because I'd … Continue reading Is Drumming Better than Prozac? An Anthropological Reflection

The Fortunate Failure of ‘Voluntary Repatriation’ For Rohingya Refugees

Reposted from The Irrawaddy, February 11, 2019 By TONY WATERS  In 2017 and 2018, between 600,000 and 800,000 Rohingya fled Myanmar following attacks and clearance operations targeting their villages and coordinated by the Myanmar military. The result is the world’s largest refugee camp, Kutupalong, situated in a low-lying corner of Cox’s Bazar District in Bangladesh. The … Continue reading The Fortunate Failure of ‘Voluntary Repatriation’ For Rohingya Refugees

Who Influneces American Foreign Policy in Burma More?  James C. Scott or John Rambo?

James C. Scott is one of the major social science writers of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.  His first book Moral Economy of the Peasant published in 1976, studied Vietnamese peasants, and how they resisted social change while being rooted in a different “moral economy.”  In subsequent decades he expanded his work to … Continue reading Who Influneces American Foreign Policy in Burma More?  James C. Scott or John Rambo?

Would sobriety coins be an acceptable form of payment at the liquor store?

Notes From the Liquor Store It's the second time Rita has been into the liquor store where I work in Chico, California.  Last time was Wednesday, when it was pouring rain, and the man she was with was dressed from hood to boots in bright yellow PVC.   She's from Paradise, or what was the town … Continue reading Would sobriety coins be an acceptable form of payment at the liquor store?

“Certain esoteric rites” for The Ethnographer

There need be no explanation for most occupations– but ethnographer?  At least one of Argentina's beloved poets would not have asked what I do if we'd met at a cocktail party, so I'd told him I was an ethnographer.  It's 1969, an assortment of olives and cheese crumbles between us, I swirl my dram glass … Continue reading “Certain esoteric rites” for The Ethnographer

Discipline and Modern Society: Something about Max Weber and Well-Paid Development Bureaucrats!

Hey, I published a book last October, Max Weber and the Problem of Modern Discipline. It is about Max Weber’s view of authority, and why so many of us obey.  What follows is a lightly edited version of the introductory chapter where I have a bit of fun comparing subsistence peasants to well-paid UN bureaucrats..  … Continue reading Discipline and Modern Society: Something about Max Weber and Well-Paid Development Bureaucrats!

The Place That Is Our Home

In 1978, Remmy Ongala left his home in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (not far from the city of Bukavu) for Tanzania.  He boarded a boat across Lake Tanganyika to Kigoma, Tanzania's main port city on the great lake.  From Kigoma, he then traveled by train to Dar es Salaam to eventually become one … Continue reading The Place That Is Our Home

Mon Mon Myat’s Articles in the Irrawaddy Times of Myanmar/Burma

I spent last semester in Chico, California, where occasionally the issue of Burma/Myanmar would come up. A number of people in Chico are well-enough read that they have familiarity with the issues there primarily through writing in the western press, particularly The New York Times.  The western press highlights the role of the Nobel Laureate … Continue reading Mon Mon Myat’s Articles in the Irrawaddy Times of Myanmar/Burma

When is the country between India and Thailand called Burma or Myanmar?

English speakers seemingly use the word Burma or Myanmar to describe that country.  My impression is that it is somewhat interchangeable.  If you use Burma instead of “Myanmar” it is some how ok—you just sound a bit old-fashioned, which is perhaps how the United States Embassy in "Burma" sounds to ears inside Myanmar.  On the … Continue reading When is the country between India and Thailand called Burma or Myanmar?

Quick Repatriation of Rohingya Refugees is Not a Durable Solution

I published the following last July in The Irrawaddy, an active publisher about current events in Myanmar, and publishes (and broadcasts) in Burmese, and English. One of my PhD students, Mon Mon Myat publishes there regularly in both languages and urged me to do submit the following article. The article is about the Rohingya refugee … Continue reading Quick Repatriation of Rohingya Refugees is Not a Durable Solution

Ethnography.com is reborn for 2019!

Well, it looks like Ethnography.com is going through a third or fourth re-design!  Christina Quigley is taking over the web-master duties and getting the blog ready for 2019!  This comes after a 1-2 year hiatus when little new content was posted.  This will hopefully change, as both Christina and I begin to post ethnographic observations … Continue reading Ethnography.com is reborn for 2019!

My Life as an Honored Potted Plant

Meetings are rituals, and rituals need symbols, and decorations, in other words potted plants.  I've been to a lot of meetings in my time as an academic where I sat bored and confused, but still clap on cue.  The most obvious place I am such a decoration is in May graduation ceremonies.  I sit in … Continue reading My Life as an Honored Potted Plant