How Class Differences Shape Love and Marriage

I just ordered and am very excited to soon be reading, The Power of the Past: Understanding Cross-Class Marriages by Jessi Streib. Books about marriage are plentiful but an ethnographic account of cross-class marriages is something new. If you click this link, it will direct you to a Washington Post article written by Streib that gives you a … Continue reading How Class Differences Shape Love and Marriage

Corporatocracy and the McDonaldization of Work in Higher Education

In the fifth segment of the fantastic book Cloud Atlas, David Mitchell paints a picture of a future in “Corprocratic” (and post-apocalyptic) Neo Seoul, where its bored, spoiled citizens thrive on gallerias and franchises and are legally required to consume products. In Mitchell’s rationalized future, a surplus of deskilled “fabricants” perform the grunt labor of … Continue reading Corporatocracy and the McDonaldization of Work in Higher Education

Money Changes Everything: The Ascent of Walter White

Have you been watching the Breaking Bad prequel, Better Call Saul? I have and I love it. I swear, Vince Gilligan is a modern-day Rod Serling, nobody since Serling's Twilight Zone has been able to create a morality play like Mr. Gilligan and his crew (the general theme: "be careful what you wish for, you just might get it"). … Continue reading Money Changes Everything: The Ascent of Walter White

R.I.P. Sociology?

Re-posted from a blog by Julie here at e.com last fall, 2014. Thanks to Les Back at The Sociological Review for the inspiration. It’s the holidays and I’m feeling nostalgic, thinking about this time 14 years ago when I was just finishing up my first semester at CSU, Chico. I was a 34-year old college … Continue reading R.I.P. Sociology?

A Season of Homicides: What Happened to Marc Thompson?

 published December 15, 2014 in the Synthesis (no longer in print) The Boondocks Mountain House and Brush Creek are part of an unincorporated area 25 miles or so east of Oroville, California. They are tiny burgs off the old Oroville-Quincy Highway, on the way to Buck’s Lake Wilderness, Quincy, and countless outdoor opportunities in Plumas … Continue reading A Season of Homicides: What Happened to Marc Thompson?

What Happened to Marc Thompson?

Yesterday was the six-month anniversary of my friend Marc Thompson's murder. Marc was a good friend of mine and a former Sociology student. A few years ago, we made a documentary together called If These Halls Could Talk. The movie also starred our mutual friend Joe Rogers. Like Marc, Joe is a Soc major and in addition to … Continue reading What Happened to Marc Thompson?

National Adjunct Walkout Day #NAWD

I started adjuncting in spring 2006, about two weeks after turning in my MA thesis at California State University, Chico. I was hired to teach sociology by an Anthropology professor I'd taken in grad school who was also the chair of the social and behavioral sciences (SBS) department at Butte Community College. I reread my … Continue reading National Adjunct Walkout Day #NAWD

Why Community College is Still the Best Bet for Working Class Students

This originally appeared on the Working-Class perspectives blog at this link. Given the continuing stigma of community college education, it's important we support community college students. You can read more about the community college/real college divide here. Recently, a friend asked me whether I’d encourage my own children (if I had them) to attend a … Continue reading Why Community College is Still the Best Bet for Working Class Students

Mother Hens and Nice Girls: How Gender and Class Show Up at Work

"My own sex, I hope, will excuse me, if I treat them like rational creatures, instead of flattering their fascinating graces, and viewing them as if they were in a perpetual state of childhood, unable to stand alone." -Mary Wollstonecraft Since writing about class and feminism here a couple of weeks ago, I've been booked … Continue reading Mother Hens and Nice Girls: How Gender and Class Show Up at Work

Teaching Ferguson

To me, a professor that effectively teaches about race and ethnic relations (as they play out in the U.S.) is as valuable as any Physics or History prof. We aren't always seen that way (by White administrators, conservative White students, and many of our White communities), but after teaching this topic every semester for six years, I … Continue reading Teaching Ferguson

Trauma Culture: Who’s a “Normal” Now?

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was unheard of when Erving Goffman published Stigma in 1963. It was first identified as shell shock (WWI) and later as combat stress reaction (WWII), always associated with the trauma of battle. Now, we know that PTSD can arise from experiencing a natural disaster, rape, child abuse, racism, a serious car … Continue reading Trauma Culture: Who’s a “Normal” Now?

The Best Book of the 21st Century (so far)

It's Monday and I don't know what you did this weekend but I finished one book (Americanah) and started another (Descent). Since I quit teaching, reading has returned as my favorite thing to do. I always had the time but never took it, something about the frenzy of teaching that made it so I could … Continue reading The Best Book of the 21st Century (so far)